L-R: Marc Morial, the president and CEO of the National Urban League; Wade Henderson, the president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and The Leadership Conference Education Fund; Sherrilyn Ifill, the president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund; Kristen Clarke, the president and executive director of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under the Law; and Melanie Campbell, the president and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation hold a press conference following a meeting with Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C., in March 2017.

(Freddie Allen/AMG/NNPA)

By Lauren Victoria Burke

NNPA Newswire Contributor

Earlier this month, leaders from six civil rights groups met with Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Justice Department to discuss a range of issues that are critical to the Black community.

The meeting was attended by Kristen Clarke, the president and executive director of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under the Law; Sherrilyn Ifill, the president and director-counsel of the

NAACP Legal Defense Fund; Marc Morial, the president and CEO of the National Urban League; Melanie Campbell, the president and CEO of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation; Reverend Al Sharpton, the president of the National Action Network; and Wade Henderson, the president and CEO of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and The Leadership Conference Education Fund.

The leaders expressed their concerns about the future of the civil rights gains made under the Obama
Administration. They also expressed concerns about the recent rash of hate crimes, the consent decree
involving Baltimore’s police department and the impact that any potential, “mythical” voting fraud investigation could have on voters’ rights. During an interview with Fox News earlier this year,
President Donald Trump announced that Vice President Mike Pence would lead a commission to inves
tigate allegations of voter fraud. ThinkProgress.org reported that President Trump claimed that he would have won the popular vote if it were not for three to five million illegal votes. President Trump has never offered any evidence to support this claim.

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